Queens Garden looking great

This flower bed in Queens Garden, previously the “Darwin Bed”, is looking very good at the moment. It includes various plants, including several attractive grasses, from around the world. This was replanted, by idVerde staff, a couple of years ago to replace the earlier flower scheme which had been part of Bromley council’s iff-fated application for World Heritage status for the Downe area associated with Charles Darwin.

With the other flower beds in the garden currently still awaiting the summer bedding to be planted, this is the main flower display in this park. We hope soon see their contributions to the beauty of this well loved space.

Perhaps with the gradual easing of coronavirus restrictions it will not be too long before the customers of Cafe Giardino will be able to gaze down upon this attractive scene. However in the meantime we can all enjoy this, and the rest of this garden’s attractions, from ground level.

Plant Concern

IMG_1713A member of the public has expressed to the Bromley Times concerns about the planting of Ricinus communis planting (see above), which they considered is poisonous. in Library Gardens.

Idverde, in partnership with the Council, have used this plant as a bedding plant for many years as indeed many organisations do across the country, including the RHS as we understand it.  Councillor Smith’s quote below, to the Bromley Times, outlines more about how this plant is used in a Bromley context.

Councillor Colin Smith, Executive Councillor for Environment said, “This plant has been used in Bromley for many years and is used extensively as a decorative plant in many areas across the country, with the plant removed at the end of the season when the particular display is finished which is entirely normal and safe practice.   If left in situ, in common with many other bedding plants, they could grow to a substantial size, which would make it unsuitable as a bedding plant but it could also be at that stage that the plant may produce seed and this is when there may be associated risk, long after the plant has been removed as a bedding plant.”